GELP NZ Workshop and Clinic Selection


The GELP NZ Programme includes seven breakout sessions. Participants should select the Workshops and Clinic you would like to attend via the online link that will be sent to you.  If you have not made your selection please contact:  gelpnz@tcc.co.nz 

Workshops

Each of GELP NZ’s three organising themes includes two rounds of Workshops.
You have the opportunity to choose one Workshop in each round, making a total of six Workshops over two days.
Workshops are interactive.  Each Presenter has prepared a Workshop that focuses on their own work and learnings, and on how that work can inform the work of others in different countries and jurisdictions.
Many Presenters have identified Readings to accompany their Workshop. Readings are optimally read before the GELP NZ event.  Some Readings are accessed via live web links and others are in PDF document format.  Links to the readings are provided below.

Clinics

GELP NZ offers one round of Clinics.  You have the opportunity to choose to participate in one Clinic.
Clinics are focused around gaining participants’ input into a problem of practice related to educational transformation.  Clinic Presenters put forward a problem, challenge or dilemma that they would like your help on.
The Clinic session follows a set protocol with the Presenter quickly laying out their challenge or problem, the group discussing it and offering advice and solutions and finishing with a summary of the session’s learnings by the Presenter. Clinic problems usually have resonance for many participants in thinking about their own education system context.

Theme 1 Workshops
Round 1: 11.45am-12.45pm

Developing 21st century competencies for all students

Presenter: Alexis Menton, Executive Director, Program Development, Asia Society Center for Global Education, USA
Chair: Anthony Mackay, Co-Chair, GELP

A commitment to developing 21st-century competencies is found in mission statements of many schools across the globe and in education policy statements worldwide. These competencies, however, are rarely intentionally and systematically integrated into primary and secondary education. This workshop will share lessons learned from a Working Group of city education systems that share successes and explore challenges on the development of 21st century competencies for all students. Participants will explore how 21C competencies can become an integrated part of the education system; what integration of 21st century competencies looks like at system and the school level and immediate next steps for your work.

Readings
A Rosetta Stone for Noncognitive Skills: Understanding, Assessing, and Enhancing Noncognitive Skills in Primary and Secondary Education (Asia Society and Professional Examination Service) http://asiasociety.org/files/A_Rosetta_Stone_for_Noncognitive_Skills.pdf

Measuring 21st Century Competencies: Guidance for Educators (Asia Society and RAND Corporation) http://asiasociety.org/files/gcen-measuring21cskills.pdf

Ki Te Āo hou i te āo tawhito – Ancestrally driven, future focused

Presenter: Watson Ohia, Principal, Ngā Taiātea Wharekura & Uenuku Fairhall; Principal, Te Kura o Te Koutu, New Zealand
Chair: David Albury, Board Director, Innovation Unit 

The Workshop will explore the world of Māori education through the eyes of two principals, from two different settings of Māori education. It will showcase the importance of language and culture by being responsive to the development and growth of Māori citizens, in a Māori way, by Māori, for Māori. It will explore the challenges and the successes seen through Māori-Medium education, creating a future focused environment that caters to the development of all our tamariki, (children) in New Zealand. Workshop participants will see why this work has demanded a different approach to, and type of, leadership.

Readings
Ngā Kura ā Iwi o Aotearoa Information Booklet

Education and The New Work Order

Presenter: Jeanette Pope, Director of Strategy, Policy and Research, Foundation for Young Australians, Australia
Chair: Kathe Kirby, Executive Director, GELP

The New Work Order - preparing young Australians for jobs of the future not the past report finds that jobs of the future will be significantly affected by three economic forces: automation, globalization and more flexible work. The report shows close to 60 per cent of Australian students are being trained for occupations where at least two-thirds of jobs will be automated in coming years. The Report highlights education policy options that could maximize the opportunities and minimize the risks for young people in the future. 

Readings
The New Work Order Report: http://www.fya.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/fya-future-of-work-report-final-lr.pdf

From Knowledge-Based Economy to a Wisdom-Based Society

Presenter: Professor Pavel Luksha, Director, Global Education Futures, Russia
Chair: Valerie Hannon, Co-Chair, GELP

A knowledge based economy as set out by the OECD in 1996 may not be the culmination of the modern society evolution but actually a transitory phase towards an emergent future society based on wisdom as its key value (Dalal 2008). This future society will pose new requirements for skills & knowledge. It may also call for the return to indigenous ‘wisdom-maintenance’ practice. During this workshop participants will collectively develop the vision of emergent wisdom-based society & aspects of educational systems that best serve its needs.

Readings
Introduction of the concept: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGgBcThZNps

N.Dalal (2008) Wisdom Networks: Towards a Wisdom-Based Society. In: Communications in Computer and Information Science, vol. 19, pp. 11-18 http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-540-87783-7_2

OECD (1996) The Knowledge-Based Economy. Report OCDE/GD(96)102 http://www.oecd.org/sti/sci-tech/1913021.pdf

Theme 1 Workshops
Round 2: 1.30-2.30pm

Developing 21st century competencies for all students

Presenter: Alexis Menton, Executive Director, Program Development, Asia Society Center for Global Education, USA
Chair: Valerie Hannon, Co-Chair, GELP

A commitment to developing 21st-century competencies is found in mission statements of many schools across the globe and in education policy statements worldwide. These competencies, however, are rarely intentionally and systematically integrated into primary and secondary education. This workshop will share lessons learned from a Working Group of city education systems that share successes and explore challenges on the development of 21st century competencies for all students.
Participants will explore how 21C competencies can become an integrated part of the education system; what integration of 21st century competencies looks like at system and the school level and immediate next steps for your work.

Readings
A Rosetta Stone for Noncognitive Skills: Understanding, Assessing, and Enhancing Noncognitive Skills in Primary and Secondary Education (Asia Society and Professional Examination Service) http://asiasociety.org/files/A_Rosetta_Stone_for_Noncognitive_Skills.pdf

Measuring 21st Century Competencies: Guidance for Educators (Asia Society and RAND Corporation) http://asiasociety.org/files/gcen-measuring21cskills.pdf

ki Te Āo hou i te āo tawhito – Ancestrally driven, future focused

Presenter: Watson Ohia, Principal, Ngā Taiātea Wharekura; & Uenuku Fairhall, Principal, Te Kura o Te Koutu, New Zealand
Chair: David Albury,
Board Director, Innovation Unit

The Workshop will explore the world of Māori education through the eyes of two principals, from two different settings of Māori education. It will showcase the importance of language and culture by being responsive to the development and growth of Māori citizens, in a Māori way, by Māori, for Māori. It will explore the challenges and the successes seen through Māori-Medium education, creating a future focused environment that caters to the development of all our tamariki, (children) in New Zealand. Workshop participants will see why this work has demanded a different approach to, and type of, leadership.

Readings
Ngā Kura ā Iwi o Aotearoa Information Booklet

Ways of knowing: Australian Curriculum

Presenter: Robert Randall, CEO, Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority, Australia
Chair: David Istance, Director OECD CERI

A new Australian Curriculum centres on improving the quality, equity and transparency of Australia’s education system. ‘Quality’ meaning an Australian Curriculum contributes to a world-class education by setting out the knowledge, understanding and skills needed for life and work in the 21st century. ‘Equity’ meaning an Australian Curriculum provides a clear, shared understanding of what young people should be taught and the quality of learning expected of them, regardless of their circumstances. The workshop explores how well the Curriculum meets the expectations of a diverse student population; how well it allows for students to see themselves in the curriculum and to value the backgrounds of others. Participants will reflect on strategies they have in place in their own country to enhance young people’s ways of knowing. 

Readings
Australian Curriculum www.acara.edu.au/verve/_resources/the_shape_of_the_australian_curriculum_v4.pdf

From Knowledge-Based Economy to a Wisdom-Based Society

Presenter: Professor Pavel Luksha, Director, Global Education Futures, Russia
Chairs: Anthony Mackey, Co-Chair, GELP

A knowledge based economy as set out by the OECD in 1996 may not be the culmination of the modern society evolution but actually a transitory phase towards an emergent future society based on wisdom as its key value (Dalal 2008). This future society will pose new requirements for skills & knowledge. It may also call for the return to indigenous ‘wisdom-maintenance’ practice. During this workshop participants will collectively develop the vision of emergent wisdom-based society & aspects of educational systems that best serve its needs.

Readings
Introduction of the concept: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGgBcThZNps

N.Dalal (2008) Wisdom Networks: Towards a Wisdom-Based Society. In: Communications in Computer and Information Science, vol. 19, pp. 11-18 http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-540-87783-7_2

OECD (1996) The Knowledge-Based Economy. Report OCDE/GD(96)102 http://www.oecd.org/sti/sci-tech/1913021.pdf

Theme 2 Workshops
Round 1: 5.00-6.00pm

Creating a learning ecosystem: strategies for success

Presenter: Professor Pavel Luksha, Director, Global Education Futures, Russia
Chair: Dr Simon Breakspear, Senior Associate, Centre for Strategic Education

Education systems around the world are giving way to emerging learning ecosystems, (organically evolving self-organized systems of multiple providers that cater to individual and collective learner needs across human lifecycle), as opposed to far more rigid, hierarchically organized, machine-like industrial education structures. However, existing ‘industrial’ models of education systems are preserved by interdependent institutional lock-ins that are hard to disrupt. The workshop will address productive strategies for scaling up systemic educational innovations building towards learning ecosystems.

Readings
Recombinant Education: Regenerating the Learning Ecosystem. Knowledge Works Report (2012) http://www.knowledgeworks.org/sites/default/files/Forecast3_0.pdf

Global Education Future – report of GEF-California session (2015) http://www.slideshare.net/edu2035/gef-california-results

Kentucky Rising - transforming our learning system for global readiness

Presenters: Barbara Bellissimo, CEO, The Fund for Transforming Education & Dr Tom Shelton, Executive Director, Kentucky Association of School Superintendents, USA
Chair: Anthony Mackay, Co-Chair, GELP

How does one jurisdiction in the United States begin to position itself to compete on a world stage? Kentucky decided that having the best public education system in the USA wasn’t good enough. We want to compete globally, and not just improve incrementally to match the other high-performing jurisdictions around the world. This workshop presents our progress so far and seeks input on best ways to move forward. It explores challenges we faced bringing various stakeholders into the process and discusses how you can build an alliance of many stakeholders to dramatically impact your education system.

Readings
Kentucky Rising: 9 Building Blocks

FRAMEWORKS AND TOOLS FROM OECD INNOVATIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS PROJECT

Presenter: David Istance, Project Leader and Senior Researcher, Centre for Educational Research and Innovation, OECD, Global
Chair: Anthony Mackay, Co-Chair, GELP

Participants will access useful frameworks and tools developed in a major international OECD project on innovative learning environments.   The workshop will take core frameworks from the ILE work, especially from the most recent report, Schooling Redesigned: Towards innovative learning systems. It will focus on the ‘7+3 framework’ and indicators of progress to this framework; developing the ‘meso’ level of leadership and new teacher scenarios to animate a discussion of progress being made in different societies to become innovative learning systems. The concepts, findings and tools can be taken home and used in participants’ own educational community

How education systems can support innovation: A report to WISE

Presenter: Thomas Gilliford, Project Engagement Manager for Creative Learning and Development, The Royal Society for Arts, United Kingdom
Chair: Valerie Hannon, Co-Chair, GELP

This workshop will focus on nine propositions put forward by Joe Hallgarten, Valerie Hannon and Tom Beresford in their new paper for WISE, ‘Creative Public Leadership’. Participants will interrogate the validity of these propositions as well as explore the relationships that exist between them. The workshop provides the beginnings of a road-map for implementing the ideas in the paper.

Readings
http://www.wise-qatar.org/2015-wise-research-creative-public-leadership

Theme 2 Workshops
Round 2: 8.30-9.30am

An approach to a new Nervous System for Education

Presenter: Simon Heath, Principal and Co- Lead Principal of 2BCoS (two Blenheim Communities of 21 Schools), New Zealand
Chair: Dr Al Bertani, Senior Associate, Innovation Unit

The workshop explores the 2014 Investing in Educational Success Policy and developing a change process to break down school competition to one of collaborative communities of learning. It explains how the Blenheim Community of 21 Schools has grown into being, influenced policy, adapted to possibilities of system change and implemented the new policy in a change resistant education climate. Communities of Schools (now referred to as Communities of Learning) are groups of kura/schools that come together with their communities to raise achievement for all tamariki and young people by sharing expertise in teaching and learning (ako), and supporting each other, from early childhood to post secondary education, to fully include the learning (ako) journey children and young people will take.

Readings
http://www.education.govt.nz/ministry-of-education/specific-initiatives/investing-in-educational-success/

HOW EDUCATION SYSTEMS CAN SUPPORT INNOVATION: A REPORT TO WISE

Presenter: Thomas Gilliford, Project Engagement Manager for Creative Learning and Development, The Royal Society for Arts, United Kingdom
Chair: Valerie Hannon, Co-Chair, GELP

This workshop will focus on nine propositions put forward by Joe Hallgarten, Valerie Hannon and Tom Beresford in their new paper for WISE, ‘Creative Public Leadership’. Participants will interrogate the validity of these propositions as well as explore the relationships that exist between them. The workshop provides the beginnings of a road-map for implementing the ideas in the paper.

Readings
http://www.wise-qatar.org/2015-wise-research-creative-public-leadership

Building a Mystery – unleashing innovation in Public Education systems

Presenters: Mark Ramsankar, President & Jeff Johnson, Executive Officer, Alberta Teachers Federation, Canada
Chairs: Dr Simon Breakspear, Senior Associate CSE

The Alberta Teachers’ Association is in a unique position to serve the teachers and leaders of Alberta as both a union and a professional association. Alberta is one of the highest achieving education jurisdictions in the world due, in no small part to the ability of its teachers to work collaboratively as a unified profession - including those in administration who are also teachers.  One of the challenges we are grappling with is how to act as a catalyst for innovation and iterative change in a public education system.  This session provides an overview of the Alberta Teachers’ Association and explores some of the ways the organization is working to unleash the innovative forces that exist in a group of 43,000 teachers in a public education system.

Kentucky Rising - transforming our learning system for global readiness

Presenters: Barbara Bellissimo, CEO, The Fund for Transforming Education, & Dr Tom Shelton Executive Director, Kentucky Association of School Superintendents, USA
Chair: Anthony Mackay, Co-Chair, GELP

How does one jurisdiction in the United States begin to position itself to compete on a world stage? Kentucky decided that having the best public education system in the USA wasn’t good enough. We want to compete globally, and not just improve incrementally to match the other high-performing jurisdictions around the world. This workshop presents our progress so far and seeks input on best ways to move forward. It explores challenges we faced bringing various stakeholders into the process and discusses how you can build an alliance of many stakeholders to dramatically impact your education system. 

Readings
Kentucky Rising: 9 Building Blocks

Theme 3 Workshops
Round 1: 1.15-2.15pm

New environments in Finnish education: digital perspective

Presenter: Aija Rinkinen, Counsellor of Education, Finnish National Board of Education , Finland
Chair: Valerie Hannon, Co-Chair, GELP

The workshop will look at the future of Finnish education. We will use two of the newest policy documents to do so: the  Strategic Programme of Finnish Government  (launched in June 2015) and the new core curricula in Finnish basic education (in use, fall 2016). Special attention will be paid to the new pedagogies and new learning environments – especially digital environments. Participants will take a close look at own situation in this area.

Readings
Finland, a land of solutions

Big Picture Education: one student at a time 

Presenter:  Mike Hollings, CEO, Te Kura Correspondence School, New Zealand
Chair: Dr Simon Breakspear, Senior Associate CSE

Big Picture Learning was designed by US educators, Dennis Littky and Elliott Washer in 1995. Big Picture builds each student’s learning around their interests, passions and potential in real life learning contexts. In this workshop you will hear from two leaders and two students about how the model is implemented in Australia and New Zealand and how it is growing internationally. Research demonstrating the success of the model will be presented and attention given to the challenges of innovation and implementation in different policy and system environments. 

Readings
Big Picture NZ by distance (video) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_UzRLWa_Zg&index=1&list=PLqNgH1bH5fC0tm9TFn85VFvcNB5UGlMZ0

The Big Picture Design and the Australian Curriculum (video) https://vimeo.com/bigpictureau/review/133524516/438a665596

10 Expectations animation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K96c-TGnSf4

Learning Frontiers

Presenters: Stacey Quince, Principal, Campbelltown Performing Arts High School, Sydney & NSW Department of Education, Futures Learning Unit; & Keren Caple, Senior Associate, Innovation Unit, Australia
Chair: David Albury, Board Director, Innovation Unit

The disciplined innovation methods of ‘design thinking’ and ‘hacking’ have shifted practice across a community of Australian schools to provide new solutions to long-term challenges. Learning Frontiers was initially introduced through the Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL) to develop new approaches for increased student engagement. Implementation has been scaled to shape practice with leaders, teachers and students at a classroom, school and hub level. Design thinking has become embedded in key change processes across a number of contexts with outstanding results.

Readings
http://www.aitsl.edu.au/learning-frontiers

Communities of Practice: Transforming approaches to teaching and learning in South Africa

Presenter: Barbara Dale-Jones, CEO, BRIDGE, South Africa
Chair: Lyn van der Elst, GELP Country Coordinator, South Africa

BRIDGE has facilitated on-going engagement among practitioners in communities of practice resulting in deep change. Practitioners are learning to share issues and experiences openly, moving toward collaboration and away from competition, taking control of their own learning, and strengthening their leadership roles through mutual support. The GELP community will learn about how a culture of reflection plays a role in professional development; How a culture of peer review helps with creating ownership and accountability; How to develop leadership capacity through experiential learning; How knowledge management supports peer engagement.

Readings
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3TS6UuhujY&feature=youtu.be

Theme 3 Workshops
Round 2: 2.15-3.15pm

Frameworks and tools from OECD Innovative Learning Environments Project

Presenter: David Istance, Project Leader and Senior Researcher, Centre for Educational Research and Innovation, OECD, Global
Chair: Anthony Mackay, Co-Chair, GELP

Participants will access useful frameworks and tools developed in a major international OECD project on innovative learning environments.   The workshop will take core frameworks from the ILE work, especially from the most recent report, Schooling Redesigned: Towards innovative learning systems. It will focus on the ‘7+3 framework’ and indicators of progress to this framework; developing the ‘meso’ level of leadership and new teacher scenarios to animate a discussion of progress being made in different societies to become innovative learning systems. The concepts, findings and tools can be taken home and used in participants’ own educational community.

New Pedagogies for Deep Learning: innovation lessons from Australia

Presenters: Lynn Davie, Co-Cluster Lead New Pedagogies for Deep Learning Australia & Dr Simon Breakspear, CEO, Learn Labs International, Australia
Chair: Dr Al Bertani, Senior Associate, Innovation Unit

The workshop provides a window into the New Pedagogies for Deep Learning (NPDL) Global Partnership and how it is responding to these requirements. NPDL is practitioner led and is providing an evidence base for designing and assessing deep learning.  Brokering and enabling collaborative expertise to lead deepening learning requires: clarity of what deep learning is; investigating the elements that influence changes in pedagogical practices to deepen learning; a suite of strategies to support building practice excellence and agile innovation processes.

Readings
A Rich Seam - http://www.michaelfullan.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/3897.Rich_Seam_web.pdf
http://npdl.global/
http://fuse.education.vic.gov.au/?S5FFMT 

Activating student partnerships to accelerate learning

Presenter: Margot Foster, Director Pedagogy and Leadership, South Australian Department for Education and Child Development, Australia
Chair: Kathe Kirby, Executive Director, GELP

The workshop will share understandings and systemic strategies trialled in response to findings from the South Australian National Partnerships Pedagogy Research 2011-2013 and analysis of the SA PISA Mathematics data.  The challenge identified was to develop learning experiences that increased learner engagement and cognitive demand – ‘stretching’ every learner.  A pilot of 10 schools Foundation to Year 12, has activated student voice to support teachers to redesign the learning – some radical, some simple processes, but early impact is promising, at both the individual site level, as well as in the Local Partnership.

Creating educational equity in STEM 

Presenters: Dr Michelle Dickinson (aka Nanogirl), Senior Lecturer in Engineering,  University of Auckland, Mary Wootton, Lead Facilitator Science Learning and Change Networks, University of Auckland, New Zealand & Professor Stuart McNaughton ONZM, New Zealand Chief Education Scientific Advisor & Director, Woolf Fisher Research Centre, Faculty of Education, University of Auckland
Chair: David Albury, Board Director, Innovation Unit

STEM subjects can be perceived as hard or intimidating due to the jargon used.  Creating kinaesthetic hands-on learning experiences to build skills in science and technology can increase confidence and curiosity for students who don’t know what the future might hold. This workshop will highlight some of the pedagogy behind hands-on discovery technology workshops as well as showcase examples of how they can be applied. A presentation will be followed by a live workshop with NZ kids demonstrating the learning approach and outcomes.

Readings:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFOhmdMJl8w

Clinics
4.00pm-5.00pm

The Passion Index: a new learning metric

Presenters: Ellen Koshland, Founder, Australian Learning Lecture & Dave Faulkner, CEO, Educhangemakers , Australia
Chair: Dr Simon Breakspear, Senior Associate Centre for Strategic Education

Background
If passion, a love of learning and curiosity are essentials in the new world of work, how do we ensure that passion stays on the table when we’re talking about learning in schools? How do we connect what young people are passionate about in the rest of their learning and lives outside school? The Passion Index is a simple idea conceived to address the continuing problem of student disengagement and underachievement. The Passion Index lists the interest and passion of each student in a school, insuring that the teacher and the parents know that individual. From there a passion-led learning program can be built. The Passion Index helps teachers know their students, and guides them to a deeper understanding of what motivates and inspires each student. It seeks to link two ideas: the joy of learning and data.  

Challenge
How can the Passion Index be applied in schools? How can the Passion Index be accepted as a new education metric in our societies?

Help
We wish to work with teachers, leaders and students to devise a new education metric that will insure development and success to ALL students.

Readings
Passion Led Learning: a background paper, October 2015

Impacting South Africa's education system through an innovation strategy

Presenter: Dr Godwin Khosa, CEO, National Education Collaboration Trust, South Africa
Chair: Anthony Mackay, Co-Chair, GELP

Background
South Africa’s education system is characterised by low levels of learner achievement; an under-prepared teaching corps; high youth population ill-equipped for the workplace and a focus on an out-dated model of school improvement. We have a ‘burning platform’ that demands we do things differently.

Challenge
Sth Africa has adopted a National Development Plan that crafts a vision for improvement in all key sectors of society, including education. Innovation is expected to drive improved implementation. What is now needed is a coordinated innovation strategy, aligned with a shared vision for 21st century education that benefits all learners.

Help
The NECT, GELP SA, Tshikululu Social Investments and FREF have collaborated on an innovation in education study, resulting in a draft innovation strategy for Sth Africa. A critique of the strategy is requested in this Clinic.

A Futures Learning Unit: driving systemic innovation

Presenters: Kim Proctor, A/Director, Futures Learning Unit, NSW Department of Education & Stacey Quince, Principal, Campbelltown Performing Arts High School, Australia
Chair: David Albury, Board Directoy, Innovation Unit

Background
The New South Wales Department of Education’s Futures Learning Unit is focused on building capacity across the workforce to drive innovative learning and teaching, effectively leveraging space and technology, informed by new evaluation methodologies.

Challenge
With over 2000 diverse school communities stretched across 800 000 sq kilometres, transformation is no easy task. Some schools are innovative and future-focused, others are less agile and adaptable. 

Help
How can we capture, scale and diffuse innovative and deeply engaging practices across NSW? How can we support already innovative schools and individuals to continue to innovate and co-create new approaches to learning?

How to build an innovation eco-system in your country?

Presenter: Ismael Palacín Giner, Director, Fundació Jaume Bofill , Catalonia, Spain
Chair: Valerie Hannon, Co-Chair, GELP

Background
Fundació Jaume Bofill has a reputation as a strong research and policy-advice think tank in education in Catalonia, a region of Spain that hopes to become a new country. 

Challenge
Our Foundation is building a new “theory of change” and strategy to reach a systemic and deeper impact on education. We think we should be moving towards innovation, leadership promotion and focusing on the next 3-5 years of educational challenges if we want to make a bold impact. 

Help
Participants to advise how we can catalyse and support an innovation ecosystem in our country? Is it through connecting leaders, changemakers and innovators? Or identifying and scaling programs?
What 5 challenges with high potential to overcome inequalities should we focus on: Leadership for school transformation, school desegregation, new out-of-school models, effective family involvement and preventing post-compulsory school dropout? 

Readings:
http://goo.gl/AbePnX

Collective accountability for improvement - harnessing the power of partnership

Presenters: Jayne Johnston, Chief Education Officer & Anne Millard, Executive Director, School and Preschool Improvement, Department for Education and Child Development, South Australia
Chair: Kathe Kirby, Executive Director, GELP

Background
In 2013 the South Australian Education Department brought in an integrated support approach to early childhood services and school education. The Department moved from a traditional regional structure to Education and Child Development Local Partnerships. 20 Education Directors were appointed to establish and build 60 ECD Local Partnerships. The Department worked to realign business systems to support schools and preschools in the partnership model (Building a High Performing System). We introduced Partnership Performance Reviews to promulgate successful practice in preschools and schools, inform systemic reform, strengthen accountability, drive continuous improvement and reinforce collective action via Partnerships.

Challenge
The challenge is to use the performance review process to build a culture of collective accountability for improved student learning and wellbeing that provides a powerful interface between local and system action.

Help
Participants to help clarify the place and potential of Performance Reviews in building a coherent high performing education system.

Readings:
A High Performing System

A new starting point for education in The Netherlands?

Presenter: Marcel van Loo, Principal/Board Director, Ons Middelbaar Onderwijs (OMO), The Netherlands 
Chairs: Dr Al Bertani, Senior Associate, Innovation Unit

Background
In The Netherlands there is currently much dialogue about education and schools. Everyone has a view on what is important for education and school in order to prepare the children of today for the society of tomorrow. (see Reading).

Dilemma
It is not clear who owns the school. Why we go to school and how we define ‘Education’ seems to be an accumulation of wishes, goals and insights of many groups, individuals and stakeholders. Do we combine all these - or do we develop a deeper insight of what education is for?

Help
Participants insights about which dimensions we can agree on to define education (eg cooperation, compassion, health, global position, citizenship, critical thinking, good humans, ranking, research, happiness, challenges, and so on).
And…Do we start wih a new definition for education first and then set goals and define content and organization and autonomy and so on. Or do we think outside of our past and focus on the situation of today? 

Readings:
The Dutch Education System

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