Post Event – Study Visits to Sites of Education Excellence

Following the conclusion of the 12th GELP event, New Zealand has extended the opportunity to international delegates to participate in visits to local education institutions.  The sites have been selected to illustrate the three themes of the GELP event:

  • Theme 1: What learning is for: a focus on ways of knowing and what is worth knowing informed by indigenous/First Nation perspectives, the growing diversity of our populations and the needs of society and economy
  • Theme 2: The shared responsibility for learning: co-ownership of learning outcomes through collaboration between education systems, local communities and new partners.
  • Theme 3:  Innovative learning environments: new models for learning, new pedagogies, digital learning and the educator workforce for the future.

This page contains information on the 11 sites able to be visited on Wednesday 25 November or Thursday 26 November 2015.  
Please click here to download this information as a PDF.

You can pre-select your study visit options by emailing site.visits@education.govt.nz or select your study visit options at the registration desk on arrival.

Please click here to download the Study Tour Programme.

Day Choose one study visit option per session

Wednesday Morning
Session

Te Kura Māori o Ngā Tapuwae Stonefields School Pakuranga College Parnell Kindergarten
Bus departing 8:00am 8:45am 8:40am 8:50am
Wednesday Afternoon
Session
Newton Central School Western Springs College Auckland Normal Intermediate  
Bus departing 1:20pm 1:00pm 12:50pm  
Thursday Morning
Session
Aorere College Sylvia Park School Hobsonville Point Primary School Hobsonville Point Secondary School
Bus departing 8:45am 8:45am 8:45am 8:45am

 

Age group

Study visit option

When

On display

Early childhood Parnell Kindergarten Wednesday AM Theme 1 & 3
Primary Newton Central School
Sylvia Park School
Hobsonville Point Primary School
Stonefields School
Auckland Normal Intermediate
Wednesday PM
Thursday AM
Thursday AM
Wednesday AM
Wednesday PM
Theme 1 & 2
Theme 2 & 3
Theme 2 & 3
Theme 2 & 3
Theme 2 & 3
Primary & Secondary Te Kura Māori o Ngā Tapuwae Wednesday PM Theme 1 & 2
Secondary Western Springs College
Aorere College
Hobsonville Point Secondary School
Pakuranga College
Wednesday PM
Thursday AM
Thursday AM
Wednesday AM
Theme 1 & 2
Theme 1 & 2
Theme 2 & 3
Theme 2 & 3

 

Where: Parnell Kindergarten
What: Parnell Kindergarten is an early childhood education provider in Parnell Auckland. The centre has around 30 children, 3 fully qualified teachers a teacher’s aide and an administrator.
Why: Parnell Kindergarten is an inspiring environment that supports positive learning outcomes for children. It provides a high quality programme focused on developing confident learners. This has extended to the progressive introduction of information and communication technologies (ICT) for the children.
Within the kindergarten, Teachers have good processes to identify and respond the aspirations of Māori whānau and ensure that the backgrounds of all families are valued and their knowledge affirmed. The kindergarten works hard to prioritise meaningful, relevant learning experiences for all children and values te reo and tikanga Māori.
How: Parnell Kindergarten would like to share:
• the way we work with the community to ensure learning is supported within the kindergarten and beyond
• how we implement an emergent curriculum – aligned to Te Whāriki
• the experiential environment we provide for children as both a development and learning stimulator
When: Visit scheduled for Wednesday 9:30am-11:30am
Weblinks: Parnell website
ERO Reports
Themes: Theme 1: What is learning for
Theme 3: Innovative learning environments

 

Where: Newton Central School
What: Newton Central School is a co-ed decile 8 contributing primary school (Years 1-6) located in Central Auckland. The primary school currently has 274 students.
Why: Newton Central School prides itself on a truly bicultural education approach that incorporates both English and te reo Māori into all aspects of learning. Approximately a quarter of the students are engaged in Māori-medium education (following Te Marautanga o Aotearoa) and participating at different levels of Māori language immersion.

The school also features a strong social justice and environmental awareness ethos that ensures both safety and responsibility within the student population. A key advantage is the schools location next to regenerating native forest and the opportunity this provides to make tangible links to the land and conservation.
How: Newton Central School would like to share:
• how older or more skilled students support the learning of others (using a tuakana/teina model)
• examples of affirming learning environments contribute to culturally-secure students
• the way families and whānau are involved and visible within the school
• evidence of co-constructed learning between teachers and students through a culture-of-care
When: Visit scheduled for Wednesday 1:45pm- 3:45pm 
Weblinks: Newton website
Ministry information
ERO Reports
Themes: Theme 1: What is learning for
Theme 2: The shared responsibility for learning

 

Where: Sylvia Park School
What: Sylvia Park School is a co-ed decile 2 full primary school (Years 1-8) located in Mt Wellington, Auckland. The primary school currently has 511 students, 26 teachers and 14 support staff.
Why: Sylvia Park School provides high quality education for students in Years 1 to 8. School leaders have maintained and extended the school’s very good performance. This is a dynamic and successful school that features high levels of collaboration between students, whānau, teachers and leaders. The school enacts its vision to empower students to stand tall and be proud. Students are clearly at the centre of adults’ decision making. Trustees are experienced and are representative of the community. They work in partnership with the senior leadership team. New leadership structures are being developed as the roll continues to expand. The school’s absolute focus has always been on raising student achievement, the school community is very aware of the importance of education in developing competent citizens and values a whole school approach to fostering student achievement.

The school has continued to develop and consolidate their successful Mutukaroa partnership programme with whānau. The driving vision of Mutukaroa is simple: If parents know more they can do more to support their child’s learning and have a more meaningful conversation and productive relationship with school.

Key school leaders now lead educational initiatives aimed at developing this partnership approach in other schools, locally, nationally and internationally. Sylvia Park School is very well placed to sustain and improve its performance. Self review is well developed and used to continually improve outcomes for students.
How: Primary would like to share:
• a formal welcome to the school
• an overview of how the school works and what drives our decision making
• how parents are engaged in Mutukaroa and the modern learning environments
• student led projects in physics and fitness
• teacher perspectives on the practice of inquiry learning
When: Visit scheduled for Thursday 9:30am-11:30am
Weblinks: Sylvia Park website
Ministry information
ERO Reports
Themes: Theme 2: The shared responsibility for learning
Theme 3: Innovative learning environments

 

Where: Hobsonville Point Primary
What: Hobsonville Point Primary is a co-ed decile 10 full primary school located in West Auckland. The primary school currently has 194 students.
Why: Hobsonville Point Primary has been designed as an Innovative Learning Environment (ILE) with collaborative teaching and learning as a key concept. The spaces and furniture are intended to enable a range of different experiences and usage opportunities. As a new school with no traditional practices, the combination of modern design and new pedagogies has enabled us to build a strong staff learning culture.
The school is based in West Auckland and built on the grounds of an old old Air Force base. The school initially opened with a roll of 21 and this grew in the first year to 48. The current roll is 194 students after three years and the school will reach 690 Year 0-8 students when full.
How: Hobsonville Point Primary would like to share:
• the vision and values that underpin the innovative practice
• the research that sits behind the thinking and practice
• the systems that support staff grow their collaborative practice and ability to contribute on a collegial way
• the systems we have developed to grow the whole child as a learner through a strong dispositional curriculum
• the connected curriculum allowing for purposeful engagement with the learning areas
• how it actually works in an ILE
When: Visit scheduled for Thursday 9:30am- 11:30am
Weblinks: Hobsonville website
Ministry information
ERO Reports
Themes: Theme 2: The shared responsibility for learning
Theme 3: Innovative learning environments

 

Where: Stonefields School
What: Stonefields School is a co-ed decile 9 full primary school (Years 1-8) located in Auckland. The primary school currently has 500 students.
Why:

Stonefields School represents a real cross-section of Auckland with more than 20 nationalities represented and drawing from both high and low socio-economic areas.

The school provides a highly inclusive and innovative environment where students experience a well designed curriculum with exciting learning experiences that promote their independence and collaborative skills. Within the school, learning happens in a variety of open spaces called hubs. In each hub, up to 80 students and 3 teachers work collaboratively.

Within the school there is a core belief that the purpose is to cause learning and to serve its community - in essence ‘Why we do what we do’ - the nature of learning and practice at Stonefields has been the result of an ongoing, iterative professional learning process as well as rigorous review.

The school-based curriculum is designed around four key vision principles:
• Building learning capacity,
• Collaboration,
• Making meaning, and
• Break through.

There is a strong focus on ensuring learners develop the capability to know how to learn as well as to acquire the necessary foundation learning knowledge, skills and conceptual understandings to develop fully.  Underneath the vision sits key scaffolds that help learners become ‘comfortable being uncomfortable’ in their learning and to actively get out of ‘I’m stuck’ situations. Carefully designed scaffolds such as the Learner Qualities, Learning Process and Learning Progressions act as key enablers for students to take ownership and drive their own learning.

How: Stonefields school would like to share:
• the collaboration that forms one of the school’s underpinning principles and is central to its approach to leadership and learning.
• access to courageous teachers who collaboratively pursue opportunities to challenge, inquire and ‘make stuff better’ for learners.
• Our culture of building and leading sincere collaboration through identifying effectiveness indicators underpinning a synergetic team
• a graduate profile identifying the ‘soft’ and ‘hard’ capabilities, skills and outcomes desired
• the supporting framework that unpacks teacher effectiveness and enables the vision to be realised in practice
• how digital tools, teacher collaboration and purposely designed spaces are used together.
When: Visit scheduled for Wednesday 9:30am- 11:30am
Weblinks: Stonefields website
Ministry information
ERO Reports
Themes: Theme 2: The shared responsibility for learning
Theme 3: Innovative learning environments

 

Where: Auckland Normal Intermediate
What: Auckland Normal Intermediate is a co-ed decile 9 intermediate school (Years 7-8) located in Auckland. The primary school currently has 726 students and 35 teaching staff.
Why: Auckland Normal Intermediate celebrates individual difference and provides opportunities for all students to experience success. Our teaching styles and strategies take into consideration students linguistic, cultural and social backgrounds, which ensures learning is authentic, engaging and relevant. It is a positive environment that is inclusive, values diversity and promotes and sustains student wellbeing.
At the school you will see that student agency is a leadership feature of our school and one that puts the learner at the centre of decision making.  Students are taught the skills to become independent and reflective learners who take responsibility for their own progress and achievement. They are also presented with a diverse range of opportunities to lead social action and are challenged to make a difference within and beyond the school community. High level activities such as strategic planning, assessment, coaching, appraisal and data analysis are some examples of student involvement. Their involvement in the life of the school can be seen here https://youtu.be/h02GEnwMvNc
How: Auckland Normal Intermediate would like to share two projects:
• the Learning and Change Network. Since its infancy we have been involved with nine other intermediates working together to raise student achievement.
• the Central Auckland Community of Learning. Having taken a lead role on developing strategies to identify shared achievement challenges we now work collaboratively to ensure there is a consistent learning pathway from early childhood to high school. Participating in a diverse range of opportunities students, teacher and leaders are encouraged to take risks, explore, innovate and create teaching and learning strategies to improve outcomes for all students.
When: Visit scheduled for Wednesday 1:30pm- 3:30pm 
Weblinks: Ak Normal website
Ministry information
ERO Reports
Themes: Theme 2: The shared responsibility for learning
Theme 3: Innovative learning environments

 

Where: Te Kura Māori o Ngā Tapuwae
What: Te Kura Māori o Ngā Tapuwae is a co-ed decile 2 composite kura (Years 1-15) located in Auckland. The kura currently has 270 students.
Why:

Te Kura Māori o Ngā Tapuwae is an iwi designated school and is a member of the confederation of schools Ngā Kura-ā-Iwi o Aotearoa. We are affiliated to a kaupapa and entity born out of the hopes, desire and aspirations of a small number of educators to create a unique learning opportunity for our Uri grounded in tukuihotanga (cultural inheritance) of our forebears. These hopes, desires and aspirations are made explicit in the constitution of Ngā Kura-ā-Iwi o Aotearoa Incorporated.

Te Kura Māori o Ngā Tapuwae is committed to maintaining the rights and responsibilities of the local iwi – Tainui, its hapu, Te Waiohua, Te Akitai, Te Ahiwaru and Te Kawerau a Maki. It is imperative that we ensure that the children in our school understand and are fully supportive of the local people and its protocols, histories and knowledge, as well as their own genealogical links in Aotearoa.

Te Kura Māori o Ngā Tapuwae will provide you with an opportunity to explore a model of learinign derived from the Theory of Multiple Intelligences (Gardner 1983, 1999) designed by Ralph Pirozzo.  With his assistance we have designed our own model that is strongly influenced by our language and traditions, adding another dimension to his model with a strong cultural and value system throughout.

How: Key guiding principles are:
• Rangatiratanga - the primacy of the role of the parent community and Iwi take to be authentically engaged in Reo Māori me ōna Tikanga
• Mana Matuhake - the total acceptance and celebration of the diversity and uniqueness of each kura and accordingly the nuances, tikanga, differences they each bring in pursuit of the fulfilment of the objects of the constitution
• Kaitiakitanga - the sanctity of the tribal knowledge, traditions, language, values and customs in our development.
• Kotahitanga - the unconditional and relentless commitment to oneness of Purpose, Action and Cohesion through all stakeholders
• Mana and Tapu = the resolute focus on each Mokopuna/Uri, their unique heritage, complete with their mana and tapu as “Kākano i ruia mai i Rangiātea”
When: Visit scheduled for Wednesday 9:00am- 11:30am
Weblinks: NgaTapuwae website
Ministry information
ERO Reports
Themes: Theme 1: What is learning for
Theme 2: The shared responsibility for learning

 

Where: Western Springs College
What: Western Springs College is a co-ed decile 8 secondary school (Years 9-15) located in Central Auckland. The college currently has 1,440 students.
Why: Western Springs College is strongly supported by families in the local community and has been the top performing decile 8 state school in New Zealand for the last seven consecutive years based on National Certificate of Achievement (NCEA) and University Entrance pass rates.
Western Springs College has developed an inclusive school culture which celebrates cultural diversity and embraces all learners, including those with special abilities and disabilities. WSC is a school where both individuality and a sense of community are highly valued; it is the only secondary school in Auckland which does not have a uniform. A distinctive feature of the school is the high priority given to facilitating student leadership opportunities: the student-led Waste-Wise, Travel-Wise and Health-Wise panels actively reflect the strength of the environmental sustainability movement within the school community.
How: Western Springs College would like to share:
• Ngā Puna O Waiorea - a Māori-medium rūmaki (immersion unit) with 215 Years 9-13 students enrolled into its special programme under the tuition and guidance of eleven kaiako (teachers/managers), and two administrative staff.
• The entire core curriculum is delivered across all levels in te reo Māori at the immersion kura.
• From this base rūmaki students increasingly access option subjects in the English-medium school.

• Close networking occurs across all curriculum areas between kaiako and mainstream colleagues to ensure rūmaki student achievement
• High levels of ongoing whānau (family) engagement with their child’s education is a significant requirement for enrolment into the rūmaki
• Co-governance requires provision for Māori representation and a Māori voice
• Co-governance partnership is based on power-sharing and consensus decision-making
• Co-management means a combination of autonomy and integration
When: Visit scheduled for Wednesday 1:30pm- 3:30pm 
Weblinks: Wstn Springs website
Ministry information
ERO Reports
Themes: Theme 1: What is learning for
Theme 2: The shared responsibility for learning

 

Where: Aorere College
What: Aorere College is a co-ed decile 2 secondary school (Years 9-15) located in Auckland. The college currently has 1,500 students, 95 teaching and 35 support staff.
Why: On average, Aorere College students enter the school a full curriculum level below national expectations however by the time they leave the majority have caught up and are gaining qualifications. In addition to improving pass rates, there has been an increase in the quality of achievement with more students gaining merit and excellence-level endorsement.
Aorere College balances school life with a wide range of sporting and cultural activities that seek to provide students with the skills they need for the future.
How: Aorere College would like to share:
• the Principal’s overview and staff perspectives on what culturally responsive teaching and learning looks like
• the way the approaches partnering with whanau and community to deliver academic mentoring
• how digital learning is being delivered and leveraged to improve outcomes for all students within the school
When: Visit scheduled for Thursday 9:30am- 11:30am
Weblinks: Aorere website
Ministry information
ERO Reports
Themes: Theme 1: What is learning for
Theme 2: The shared responsibility for learning

 

Where: Hobsonville Point Secondary School
What: Hobsonville Point Secondary School is a co-ed decile 10 secondary school located in West Auckland. The school currently has 250 students and 28 teachers.
Why: Hobsonville Point Secondary School is New Zealand’s newest Secondary School.
It opened its doors in 2014 to 125 Year 9 students and to another 125 in 2015 giving it a roll of 250 students. A new Year Level will be added each year until the full cohort will be in place in 2018.
The building was designed to modern learning environment (MLE) criteria and embraces open, visible, flexible and connected learning spaces.
Hobsonville Point Secondary School engages learners by drawing on their interests and provoking deep challenge and inquiry. The intent is to develop young people who are able to work in diverse teams, solve complex problems and who enhance their own well-being by contributing strongly to the betterment of their communities.
How: Hobsonville Point Secondary School would like to share:
• why we have changed what secondary schooling looks like
• what that change looks like in our learning environment – and give you the chance to discuss this with students and teachers
• how traditional subjects are delivered in a way that personalises learning within relevant and authentic contexts
When: Visit scheduled for Thursday 9:30am- 11:30am
Weblinks: Hobsonville website
Ministry information
ERO Reports
Themes: Theme 1: What is learning for
Theme 3: Innovative learning environments

 

Where: Pakuranga College
What: Pakuranga College is a co-ed decile 7 college located in Auckland’s Eastern Suburbs. The College has 123 teachers, 70 support staff and 2160 students representing over 50 nationalities.
Why: Pakuranga College provides an exceptional and innovative learning community that challenges and supports students to develop the skills, attitudes and values to succeed now and in the future. We place an emphasis on students owning and being actively involved in their learning. Students are encouraged to be interactive with teachers, technology and their peers, to develop understanding, and most importantly, to apply their knowledge to problem-solving.
At Pakuranga College we have developed a culture of inquiry and self-review that underpins how we operate as a whole school, within faculties and in classrooms. This culture is demonstrated through a reflective practise and inquiry approach that is used to inform the development of teachers, leaders and strategic initiatives. Two integral parts of this culture are the use of student voice to inform how we move forward as a learning organisation; and the cultivation of teacher student learning partnerships to support the development of teachers’ adaptive expertise and students’ achievement.
How: Pakuranga College would like to share:
• A culture of inquiry: How the leadership team use action research to investigate development areas
• Professional Learning Groups (PLG): How our professional development programme is extending teacher’s adaptive expertise, their capacity to use data, their ability to challenge assumptions and encouraging them to work in partnership with students to improve learning outcomes
• Building leadership capacity: How we have collaborated with local facilitators and universities to develop a professional development programme for middle leaders, together with opportunities to lead school-wide initiatives
• Developing student agency: How students have collaborated with teachers to inquire into effective teaching practices to build engagement, motivation and understanding
• Digital learning: How we have leveraged digital tools to enable staff to be more innovative with their planning in order to improve student learning
When: Visit scheduled for Wednesday 9:30am- 11:30am
Weblinks: Pakuranga website
Ministry information
ERO Reports
Themes: Theme 2: The shared responsibility for learning
Theme 3: Innovative learning environments

 

 

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